Volume 84, Issue 12 p. 3364-3372
Integrated Food Science

Physiochemical and Microbiological Quality of Lightly Processed Salmon (Salmo salar L.) Stored Under Modified Atmosphere

Nanna Abel

Corresponding Author

Nanna Abel

Dept. of Biotechnology and Food Science, Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Sverresgate 12, 7012 Trondheim, Norway

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Bjørn Tore Rotabakk

Bjørn Tore Rotabakk

Nofima AS, Richard Johnsens Gate 4, 4021 Stavanger, Norway

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Turid Rustad

Turid Rustad

Dept. of Biotechnology and Food Science, Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Sverresgate 12, 7012 Trondheim, Norway

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Vidar B. Ahlsen

Vidar B. Ahlsen

Dept. of Biotechnology and Food Science, Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Sverresgate 12, 7012 Trondheim, Norway

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Jørgen Lerfall

Jørgen Lerfall

Dept. of Biotechnology and Food Science, Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Sverresgate 12, 7012 Trondheim, Norway

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First published: 11 November 2019
Citations: 13

Abstract

Low-temperature cooking, such as sous vide, has become a favored method for processing seafood. For this method to be applicable for retail products, combinations with other processing steps are needed to keep the products safe and durable while maintaining high quality. The present experiments were designed to investigate the influence of low-temperature treatment (40, 50, or 60 °C) in combination with various packaging technologies (modified atmosphere [MA] or soluble gas stabilization [SGS]) on both the microbial growth and the physiochemical quality. Salmon loins were either kept natural or inoculated with Listeria innocua prior to drying (16 to 18 hr) in either 100% CO2 (SGS) or atmospheric air (MA packaging). All samples were sous vide treated, repackaged in MA, and stored at 4 °C for 24 days. The results showed shelf life to be significantly improved with the implementation of SGS, by prolonging the lag-phase and slowing the growth rate of both naturally occurring and inoculated bacteria. Variations in packaging technology did not significantly influence any of the tested quality parameters, including drip loss, surface color, and texture. Growing consumer demand for lightly processed seafood products makes Listeria spp. an increasing problem. The present experiment, however, has shown that it is possible to lower processing temperatures to as little as 40 or 50 °C and still obtain inhibition of Listeria, but with improved chemical quality compared to traditional processing.